JOIN THE OCT 25th Rally at the Statehouse to PROTECT MARRIAGE!!

Click here to learn more, learn the issues, how to get involved, and all the endorsing organizations as well as all the facts going on in this country, attacking those with family values.

Even California allows its people to decide on important issues AT THE POLLS – not our Gang in Trenton;  our legislators want to change the definition of marriage behind closed doors, right after election day, but before the new term.

This is an Obamanation to this countries foundations..

We challenge you to join in the mission and take a stand for the family.

This manual is designed to give you the tools you need to be involved in the policy process.

Topics include:

  • How you can be involved in the Public Policy Process
  • Getting Started
  • Take Action through communicating with media & lawmaker
  • What churches CAN and CANNOT DO
  • Marriage Minute Men Action Points
  • Instructions for signing E-Petition
  • Instructions for contacting legislators
Download Citizen Action Pack MMF 2009
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VOTE NO – NJ Ballot Question #1: Deception at its best courtesy of Lance & Lesniak

Democrat or Republican – it just doesn’t matter. This is classic deception at its best.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • By voting YES, you’re actually allowing the NJ Constitution to be changed to conform to the Trenton Cosa Nostra to pledge the full faith and credit of the State.
  • It means billions could be borrowed without voter approval to build dozens of $150 million high schools, complete with state-of-the-art theaters,stadiums, and day-care centers.
  • A “Yes” vote on Ballot Question #1 means Governor Corzine and the
    State Legislature could pass a simple law to refinance every dollar of the $37 billion
    borrowed by state authorities without voter approval.
  • Once the full faith and credit of New Jersey is pledged, all state
    sales tax money is earmarked to pay that debt before it is spent on anything else
    .
  • When its full faith and credit is pledged, the State is legally obligated to impose a new
    statewide property tax to pay its debts
    , whenever sales tax revenues are not sufficient.
  • State Legislature could pass a simple law to refinance every dollar of the $37 billion borrowed by state authorities without voter approval. If they do that, the state will give up its legal right to refuse to spend taxpayer dollars on such “unconstitutional” debt.

~~~~~~~~~

State Senators Leonard Lance (Republican) and Raymond Lesniak (Democrat)  claim a
“Yes” vote for their proposed “bipartisan” Constitutional Amendment (State Ballot
Question #1 for this November’s election) would stop independent authorities like the
EDA (Economic Development Authority) from borrowing billions of dollars without voter
approval. But the opposite is true.

Earlier this year, Governor Corzine tried to hock our toll roads to pay off $40 billion in
state debt. But the governor never said the state was legally on the hook for only $3
billion. The other $37 billion was created by independent authorities without voter
approval. As a result, the state legislature does not legally have to pay roughly $3
billion each year on that debt, and can stop payment at any time.
Every bond sold by these authorities clearly state that this was speculative junk debt
and not guaranteed by New Jersey taxpayers.

Under our present Constitution, only the voters can provide that security.

But a “yes” vote on Ballot Question #1 would change all that. It would
change the Constitution and allow state politicians to pledge the full faith and
credit of the state without voter approval for the first time since 1844. You won’t know
that if you just read the Ballot Question, and Interpretive Statement. The details are
buried in Senate Concurrent Resolution #39 which created them.


Senate Concurrent Resolution #39 states that voter approval will not
be needed to guarantee the bonds of any “autonomous public corporate entity” if there is “an
independent non-State source of revenue paid by third persons” or “a
source of revenue otherwise required to be appropriated
pursuant to another provision of
this Constitution”.

This means billions could be borrowed without voter approval.

It means billions could be borrowed without voter approval to build
dozens of $150 million high schools, complete with state-of-the-art theaters,
stadiums, and day-care centers. Any political “educator” can certify that they are needed to
provide a “thorough and efficient education” as required by our State Constitution – or
qualify under the “Property Tax Relief Fund”. But the most dangerous provision of Ballot
Question #1 is this:

“No voter approval shall be required for any such law. . . authorizing
the creation of a debt or debts. . . for the refinancing of all or a portion of any
outstanding debts or liabilities of. . .
an autonomous public corporate entity,”

A “Yes” vote on Ballot Question #1 means Governor Corzine and the
State Legislature could pass a simple law to refinance every dollar of the $37 billion
borrowed by state authorities without voter approval.
If they do that, the state will
give up its legal right to refuse to spend taxpayer dollars on such “unconstitutional” debt.

Once the full faith and credit of New Jersey is pledged, all state
sales tax money is earmarked to pay that debt before it is spent on anything else
. When
its full faith and credit is pledged, the State is legally obligated to impose a new
statewide property tax to pay its debts
, whenever sales tax revenues are not sufficient. If
you don’t believe it,
look at the fine print of last year’s Open Space bond legislation.

A “Yes” Vote on Ballot Question #1 will guarantee that this borrowing,
and the waste and corruption that goes with it, continues.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more information, visit http://www.libertyandprosperity.org or contact
Somers Point attorney Seth Grossman at seth@dandy.net or 609-927-7333. Seth Grossman hosts a
two way talk radio program on 1020AM Mondays-Fridays from 3PM to 5PM,
and breakfast discussion groups Saturday at 9AM at the Athena Diner, on New Road
between Tilton and New Roads in Northfield.

Green and garcia for Manalapan Twp. Committee

Visit Green and Garcia’s website at www.greenandgarcia.com  

View our platform, and decide on Nov. 4th, Democrat incumbent Mayor Michelle Roth (increased spending supported by35 % increase in taxes the past 2 years amounting to $6 million) and Don Holland, or Republican’s William Garcia & Ryan Green, both supporting reduction in spending, reduction in taxes, increase open space and be pro-active with Affordable Housing. Time for change – change  that will reverse the spending increases, and will NOT have the residents pay for their Health Benefits – that  alone is a savings of $28,000 per year

www.greenandgarcia.com

TODAY IS YOUR LAST DAY TO REGISTER… HERE’S YOUR ELECTION RESOURCES

…unless your associated with ACORN: they have a “special” way of doing things…

Information and resources
Division of Elections (sign in to access your voter registration account)

Polling place Search Type in your address

Voter Registration Forms, by County

Poll worker Application Form

Other Dates:

October 14
Last Day to Register to Vote for the Upcoming General Election
(21 days before the General Election)
Last day to register for upcoming General Election.

N.J.S.A. 19:31-6

October 21
Filing of Appointments or Applications for Challengers
(Second Tuesday before General Election)
On or before this date, the appointment of or application for challengers shall be filed with the county board.

N.J.S.A. 19:7-3, N.J.S.A. 19:12-7

October 27
Voter Registry List – Certification and Transmission
(8 days prior to the General Election)
On or before this date, the commissioner of registration shall certify and transmit to the county clerk a complete list of all registered voters.

N.J.S.A. 19:31-18

VISIT THE CALENDAR HERE

Alternative Budget Plan Presented By Republicans Goes Ignored By Trenton Majority

A note from Senator Beck, Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande, Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon

As you may be aware, the New Jersey Legislature passed the State
budget last Monday.

An alternative budget plan presented by Republicans contained over $1
billion in spending cuts, funded transportation and contained none of
the backdoor tax increases in the Governors budget. Unfortunately,
that plan was once again ignored by the majority in Trenton. The
Governor’s budget might look good at first glance- after years of
Republicans calling for lower spending, the budget is about $600
million less than last year. But a closer review of the budget shows
that some of the “spending cuts” are actually tax increases in
disguise, and an opportunity to fund the state’s transportation needs
for the foreseeable future was missed.

Because of those backdoor tax increases and the failure to fund
transportation, we voted against the budget.

One of the “spending cuts” was a decrease in aid to municipalities. In
most cases, if your town gets less money from the state, then they’ll
have to raise your property taxes to make up the difference.

Another of the “spending cuts” was a reduction in the Homestead Rebate
for some and the elimination of it for others. Given that last year we
were told the program was sustainable for the foreseeable future, this
was particularly disappointing, and again, a tax increase for some.

The budget also included the extension of a $62 million energy tax
which was scheduled to expire. At a time when energy costs are
skyrocketing, allowing this tax to expire would have been welcome
relief for many, but it was extended.

When Republicans offered an alternative budget plan in May, a central
part of the plan was to dedicate over $500 million a year to fund the
Transportation Trust Fund, which pays for the major repairs to our
roadways and bridges. This would have eliminated the need for a gas
tax increase, a toll increase or any of the other costly and
controversial plans suggested by the Governor. Unfortunately, this
budget does nothing to address those needs, leaving an opening for the
Governor to bring his toll road scheme back from the dead.

The debate in Trenton has now changed from ‘Can we cut?’ to ‘Where can
we cut?’. That is a victory for all New Jersey taxpayers. There is
still much work to be done, however. The pension reforms we passed on
Monday were a step in the right direction, but not as strong as we
would have preferred. We still need to fund our transportation needs
without a massive toll or tax hike. We still need to monitor the
waste, fraud and abuse of tax dollars that sadly continues to this
day.

We will continue to be your voice in Trenton and fight for the reforms
which will stop the exodus of people from New Jersey.

Sincerely,

Senator Jennifer Beck

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande

Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon

12th Legislative District

Tom Fitzsimmons
Communications Director
Legislative District 12

Senator Jennifer Beck
Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande
Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon

A way of life: Manalapan farmer preserves his land

Last year, Paul Reese was “70 percent sure” he was leaving the township.

“I actually looked down in Virginia and Maryland” and other locales with large tracts of land, the 53-year-old Manalapan farmer said. “I’ve been on a farm my whole life. I can’t live right next door to neighbors, no way. I just love land too much.”

His love of the land inspired him to take steps to hold onto his 23 acres on Sweetmans Lane, he said, and the township, the county and the state are partnering to support him in preserving the tract.

Through the state Department of Agriculture’s Planning Incentive Grant, the county, the state and the township have agreed to pay a percentage of the property’s value to deed-restrict it as farmland. The state has committed to paying 60 percent of the land’s roughly $1 million value, with the county paying 24 percent, or $182,160 and the township paying 16 percent plus $10,480 an acre, or $362,480.

Don Holland, chairman of the Municipal Agricultural Committee and the Planning Board, said the farm is among nine that have been preserved in the township, in a state that has a rich farming history.

“We want to acquire any farm,” Holland said. “There’s not that many left in Manalapan.”

Reese, who has lived on the farm nearly three decades, said he’d likely get a better deal from developers who’ve been interested in the property through the years, but saving the land was more important to him.

“There was no development here, no development there,” Reese said on his property last week, motioning to housing developments that have cropped up all around his farm. “(To the west) was all woodlands. There was a horse farm (to the south). It’s kind of sad to see the changes.”

He and his family — which includes wife, Janis, 49, daughter, Desiree, 17, and sons Elisha, 24, and Luke, 22 — raise a small number of cattle, chickens and pigs and grow watermelon, corn and hay that they eat themselves or sell from the farm.

Through the years, he has raised foot-tall plantings into 50 spruce trees more than 12 feet tall that line his driveway. The farm also is home to a stray cat, a goat and a retired racing thoroughbred named Beeps.

“I’m feeding the chickens, the sparrows,” said Reese, a former horse trainer. “I’m worried about the salamanders in the logs in the back if they started building houses. You start thinking, “What am I, going crazy?’ I’m turning down money from a builder because I’m worried about frogs.

“But living here for 27 years, you just get used to everything about a farm,” Reese said. “Being here 27 years, you start getting attached to everything.”

New Jersey by the Ugly Numbers Corzine Wants To Ignore

…by our friends at inthelobby.net

Have you ever wondered, just how did New Jersey get here?

How could a state as prosperous as ours get to the point of financial crisis that it is today?

Here are a few reasons:

10,000: The number of state employees who were hired by the state’s governors, both Republican and Democrat, between 2000 and 2006, a 17 percent gain even though the state’s population grew by only 4 percent, according to City Journal..

(Corzine brags that he’s cutting roughly 3,000 jobs wants to skip the fact that there’s still a net of +7,000 jobs over the past 6 years)

13,000: The number of full-time (or full-time equivalents) hired by agencies and authorities subsidized by state government but not directly controlled by the governor, in that same time frame.

Nearly 6 percent: The amount state spending increased a year from 2000 through 2008, nearly double the inflation rate.

33: The number of times ex-Gov. McGreevey raised taxes and fees in his short time in office.

$1.2 billion: The amount Gov. Corzine raised the sales tax in 2006.

Second-worst: New Jersey’s ranking for business-tax environment in the country, according to the Tax Foundation.

Third-worst: Managed state in the nation, according to Governing magazine.

9 percent: The amount then-Gov. DiFrancesco and the Legislature raised pensions for public employees, teachers and state lawmakers in 2001, according to the Asbury Park Press.

$5.2 billion: The amount the pension boost cost taxpayers.

Almost $8 billion: The expected cost of active and retired employee benefits, including pension and health care, in 2013, up from $2 billion this year.

Now how does Gov. Corzine’s budget and fiscal plan address these facts?

We’ve said it before, we’ll say it again. New Jersey doesn’t have a revenue problem; it has a spending problem.

Jacking the tolls up by 800 percent, or raising the gas tax, will do nothing to change that.