JOIN THE OCT 25th Rally at the Statehouse to PROTECT MARRIAGE!!

Click here to learn more, learn the issues, how to get involved, and all the endorsing organizations as well as all the facts going on in this country, attacking those with family values.

Even California allows its people to decide on important issues AT THE POLLS – not our Gang in Trenton;  our legislators want to change the definition of marriage behind closed doors, right after election day, but before the new term.

This is an Obamanation to this countries foundations..

We challenge you to join in the mission and take a stand for the family.

This manual is designed to give you the tools you need to be involved in the policy process.

Topics include:

  • How you can be involved in the Public Policy Process
  • Getting Started
  • Take Action through communicating with media & lawmaker
  • What churches CAN and CANNOT DO
  • Marriage Minute Men Action Points
  • Instructions for signing E-Petition
  • Instructions for contacting legislators
Download Citizen Action Pack MMF 2009

challenge to the SOS of NJ for allowing a non-citizen, Roger Calero, on the NJ Presidential ballot

A vigil has been organized at the US Supreme Court building for 8 am Dec 5.

vigil at Nina Wells office in Trenton at 8 am Friday.

From Jan C at

http://ubirevera.blogivists.com

I have received your blog information through the NJ AFP Rightonline Training seminar.

You may or may not be aware of the case, Donofrio v Wells, which is to be discussed in the SCOTUS Friday conference Dec 5. This is a challenge to the SOS of NJ for allowing a non-citizen, Roger Calero, on the NJ Presidential ballot. Additionally, Mr. Donofrio is challenging the Constitutional elegibility of both Barack Obama and John McCain as to the requirement for POTUS as being a ‘natural born’ citizen as specified by the Constitution.

A vigil has been organized at the US Supreme Court building for 8 am Dec 5. Someone has suggested to me that this be done at all state houses in the country, and that may or may not be a good idea, I don’t know, but, I think that particularly in NJ something should be done. I would like to hold a vigil at Nina Wells office in Trenton at 8 am Friday. Do you have any interest in supporting this effort through your blog and NJ contacts?

Leo Donofrio blog: http://www.naturalborncitizen.wordpress.com

My blog: http://www.ubirevera.blogivists.com

Youtube I have prepared on the issue:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQnL2IwyUAs

Thanks,

JanC

VOTE NO – NJ Ballot Question #1: Deception at its best courtesy of Lance & Lesniak

Democrat or Republican – it just doesn’t matter. This is classic deception at its best.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • By voting YES, you’re actually allowing the NJ Constitution to be changed to conform to the Trenton Cosa Nostra to pledge the full faith and credit of the State.
  • It means billions could be borrowed without voter approval to build dozens of $150 million high schools, complete with state-of-the-art theaters,stadiums, and day-care centers.
  • A “Yes” vote on Ballot Question #1 means Governor Corzine and the
    State Legislature could pass a simple law to refinance every dollar of the $37 billion
    borrowed by state authorities without voter approval.
  • Once the full faith and credit of New Jersey is pledged, all state
    sales tax money is earmarked to pay that debt before it is spent on anything else
    .
  • When its full faith and credit is pledged, the State is legally obligated to impose a new
    statewide property tax to pay its debts
    , whenever sales tax revenues are not sufficient.
  • State Legislature could pass a simple law to refinance every dollar of the $37 billion borrowed by state authorities without voter approval. If they do that, the state will give up its legal right to refuse to spend taxpayer dollars on such “unconstitutional” debt.

~~~~~~~~~

State Senators Leonard Lance (Republican) and Raymond Lesniak (Democrat)  claim a
“Yes” vote for their proposed “bipartisan” Constitutional Amendment (State Ballot
Question #1 for this November’s election) would stop independent authorities like the
EDA (Economic Development Authority) from borrowing billions of dollars without voter
approval. But the opposite is true.

Earlier this year, Governor Corzine tried to hock our toll roads to pay off $40 billion in
state debt. But the governor never said the state was legally on the hook for only $3
billion. The other $37 billion was created by independent authorities without voter
approval. As a result, the state legislature does not legally have to pay roughly $3
billion each year on that debt, and can stop payment at any time.
Every bond sold by these authorities clearly state that this was speculative junk debt
and not guaranteed by New Jersey taxpayers.

Under our present Constitution, only the voters can provide that security.

But a “yes” vote on Ballot Question #1 would change all that. It would
change the Constitution and allow state politicians to pledge the full faith and
credit of the state without voter approval for the first time since 1844. You won’t know
that if you just read the Ballot Question, and Interpretive Statement. The details are
buried in Senate Concurrent Resolution #39 which created them.


Senate Concurrent Resolution #39 states that voter approval will not
be needed to guarantee the bonds of any “autonomous public corporate entity” if there is “an
independent non-State source of revenue paid by third persons” or “a
source of revenue otherwise required to be appropriated
pursuant to another provision of
this Constitution”.

This means billions could be borrowed without voter approval.

It means billions could be borrowed without voter approval to build
dozens of $150 million high schools, complete with state-of-the-art theaters,
stadiums, and day-care centers. Any political “educator” can certify that they are needed to
provide a “thorough and efficient education” as required by our State Constitution – or
qualify under the “Property Tax Relief Fund”. But the most dangerous provision of Ballot
Question #1 is this:

“No voter approval shall be required for any such law. . . authorizing
the creation of a debt or debts. . . for the refinancing of all or a portion of any
outstanding debts or liabilities of. . .
an autonomous public corporate entity,”

A “Yes” vote on Ballot Question #1 means Governor Corzine and the
State Legislature could pass a simple law to refinance every dollar of the $37 billion
borrowed by state authorities without voter approval.
If they do that, the state will
give up its legal right to refuse to spend taxpayer dollars on such “unconstitutional” debt.

Once the full faith and credit of New Jersey is pledged, all state
sales tax money is earmarked to pay that debt before it is spent on anything else
. When
its full faith and credit is pledged, the State is legally obligated to impose a new
statewide property tax to pay its debts
, whenever sales tax revenues are not sufficient. If
you don’t believe it,
look at the fine print of last year’s Open Space bond legislation.

A “Yes” Vote on Ballot Question #1 will guarantee that this borrowing,
and the waste and corruption that goes with it, continues.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For more information, visit http://www.libertyandprosperity.org or contact
Somers Point attorney Seth Grossman at seth@dandy.net or 609-927-7333. Seth Grossman hosts a
two way talk radio program on 1020AM Mondays-Fridays from 3PM to 5PM,
and breakfast discussion groups Saturday at 9AM at the Athena Diner, on New Road
between Tilton and New Roads in Northfield.

TODAY IS YOUR LAST DAY TO REGISTER… HERE’S YOUR ELECTION RESOURCES

…unless your associated with ACORN: they have a “special” way of doing things…

Information and resources
Division of Elections (sign in to access your voter registration account)

Polling place Search Type in your address

Voter Registration Forms, by County

Poll worker Application Form

Other Dates:

October 14
Last Day to Register to Vote for the Upcoming General Election
(21 days before the General Election)
Last day to register for upcoming General Election.

N.J.S.A. 19:31-6

October 21
Filing of Appointments or Applications for Challengers
(Second Tuesday before General Election)
On or before this date, the appointment of or application for challengers shall be filed with the county board.

N.J.S.A. 19:7-3, N.J.S.A. 19:12-7

October 27
Voter Registry List – Certification and Transmission
(8 days prior to the General Election)
On or before this date, the commissioner of registration shall certify and transmit to the county clerk a complete list of all registered voters.

N.J.S.A. 19:31-18

VISIT THE CALENDAR HERE

Corzine gets his handpicked ethics advisory board to tell him it’s A-OK.

What was it Jon Corzine said when he was inaugurated?

Oh yes. That’s right.  “Hold me accountable.”

From our friends at inthelobby.net

Well that was then and this is now.  And now Gov. Corzine, who has managed to punt on pushing a promised tougher round of ethics reforms in the state, has apparently found a new way around inconvenient truths.

He gets his handpicked ethics advisory board to tell him it’s A-OK.

The latest example of this was the somewhat confusing, connect-the-dots case involving Xanadu.

Yes, the proposed Meadowlands shopping center/entertainment complex, inexplicably named the same as  an Olivia Newton-John song, is raising eyebrows yet again.

This time, on Thursday, just after he helpfully signs a bill to help fund a $200 million aquarium at the site, he mentions that “one of my closest friends” is a partner in the investment consortium that underwrote Xanadu’s $1.5 billion bailout in 2006, according to The Record.

That friend is Daniel Neidich, a Democratic fundraiser and an ex-colleague of Corzine’s at Goldman Sachs.  Neidich also heads a nonprofit that the governor is a founding board member of – a nonprofit that incidentally was awarded a $2 million contract with the state, but that the company later withdrew not wanting to be a distraction.

Look out Mr. Neidich.  Here comes another one of those distractions.

Corzine never told anybody about the fact that his buddy Neidich – who he had to know was controversial after the blow-up involving the nonprofit Child Study Center – was the CEO of Dune Real Estate, a hedge fund which was one of the three investors that bailed out Xanadu.

No, he casually let that drop Thursday – AFTER he signed the bill that would allow an aquarium on the site. But no worries New Jersey – the Governor’s Ethics Advisory Panel told him it was OK.

This of course, was from the same panel that said Carla Katz’s e-mails to the governor during contract negotiations were just fine too, and did not need to be disclosed. The same e-mails that a Superior Court judge later found created a clear potential for a conflict of interest, when he ordered them to be released.

“I sought advice from the Governor’s Advisory Ethics Panel,” he wrote in an odd addendum at the end of a press release citing a list of bills he had signed. “The panel advised that, as there has been full disclosure, these circumstances do not create a conflict of interest or the appearance of a conflict of interest.”
So, if we are to read this correctly, since Corzine disclosed it after the fact, it’s fine. No reason to make mention of it while the legislation was being considered, or to give time for any questions to arise.
“This bill required direct action by the governor. Xanadu’s previous business did not,” Robert Corrales, a Corzine spokesman, told The Record.
But here’s the thing. When you start drawing connect-the-dot charts, and the dots all connect, at the very least, you have an appearance of a conflict of interest. Especially when you realize that everything involving Xanadu has required direct action by the governor.  Like when he directly acted in 2006 by ordering his economic development czar, and Goldman Sachs buddy, Gary D. Rose, to work on a $1.5 billion bailout of Xanadu.  Or how he, as the Record notes, directly “boasted about his administration’s role in restructuring the Xanadu deal.”
So why oh why would he feel compelled to get an opinion now (which we should also mention was apparently just a verbal opinion, not a written one, so there is no record of what was asked of the panel, or what was disclosed).
It couldn’t have anything to do with the inconvenient truth that Rose, according to The Record,  owned stock and mutual funds in Goldman Sachs, or that the Wall Street company – an early investor in Xanadu, stood to lose some or all of the $1.1 billion it invested in the project, could it?
Or that Rose, as of March 2006, owned an interest in Dune Real Estate, according to The Record?
Deborah Howlett, Corzine’s communications director, dismissed such questions as “ridiculous.”

“If Gary Rose had stock in Pepsi would it mean we’d have to remove all the soda machines from the State House?” Howlett told The Record, later adding, “You wouldn’t even know about Gary Rose’s holdings if we didn’t disclose them.”

Well, yes, but isn’t that the point? The administration is supposed to lay all its cards out on the table, upfront, with full disclosure, and not dribble them out when it suits their time and choosing.  But that’s apparently Corzine’s way – it’s how he handled the disclosure of his financial relationship with ex-girlfriend, and former union leader, Carla Katz. It’s how he handled their e-mail controversy. It’s how he handled asset monetization. And it appears to be how he’s handling this.

But public confidence and trust in New Jersey officials is so shaky these days that full disclosure isn’t something that can be doled out piecemeal. Especially when it involves friends making money.

When you wait to make the disclosure after the fact, it only raises suspicions in people’s minds that there’s something in the Meadowlands projects that stinks.

And we’re not talking about the landfill.

Mr. Corzine Claims Privilege

NYTimes Editorial:

The governor of New Jersey, Jon Corzine, who is caught up in a potentially embarrassing lawsuit, is claiming that e-mail messages he exchanged with a union official are protected by executive privilege.

What is unusual about the case is that the official, the former leader of a state employees’ union, also was once his girlfriend. The claim of executive privilege is far too common; presidents and governors often view it as a way to get themselves out of a legal bind. In this case, it is also clearly wrong. As one court has already ruled, in a decision the governor is appealing, the e-mail messages should be released.

Tom Wilson, the chairman of the New Jersey Republican Party, filed the lawsuit to gain access to e-mails in which Mr. Corzine and the union official, Carla Katz, discuss contract negotiations between her union and the state. Mr. Wilson argues that the public has a right to see the e-mails to determine whether Ms. Katz exerted any improper influence. He is right.

Executive privilege provides presidents and governors a narrow right to privacy for discussions with their top aides to allow them to receive frank advice. Chief executives often try to stretch those privileges. Such claims are generally outweighed by the public’s right to know or the needs of the justice system for evidence of illegal activity. In the most famous privilege case, the Supreme Court rejected President Richard Nixon’s claim and ordered him to hand over the Watergate tapes.

Mr. Corzine’s case for executive privilege is particularly weak. Ms. Katz was not a member of his staff that provided him with confidential guidance. In fact, her union position put her in an adversarial relationship with the governor on the collective-bargaining issue.

There is little doubt that Mr. Wilson’s suit was intended to embarrass Mr. Corzine, who is almost certain to seek re-election next year. It may well be that if the e-mails are released, they will be harmful to Mr. Corzine’s political standing. That is not, however, a valid reason for concealing information about government operations that the public has every right to see.

Alternative Budget Plan Presented By Republicans Goes Ignored By Trenton Majority

A note from Senator Beck, Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande, Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon

As you may be aware, the New Jersey Legislature passed the State
budget last Monday.

An alternative budget plan presented by Republicans contained over $1
billion in spending cuts, funded transportation and contained none of
the backdoor tax increases in the Governors budget. Unfortunately,
that plan was once again ignored by the majority in Trenton. The
Governor’s budget might look good at first glance- after years of
Republicans calling for lower spending, the budget is about $600
million less than last year. But a closer review of the budget shows
that some of the “spending cuts” are actually tax increases in
disguise, and an opportunity to fund the state’s transportation needs
for the foreseeable future was missed.

Because of those backdoor tax increases and the failure to fund
transportation, we voted against the budget.

One of the “spending cuts” was a decrease in aid to municipalities. In
most cases, if your town gets less money from the state, then they’ll
have to raise your property taxes to make up the difference.

Another of the “spending cuts” was a reduction in the Homestead Rebate
for some and the elimination of it for others. Given that last year we
were told the program was sustainable for the foreseeable future, this
was particularly disappointing, and again, a tax increase for some.

The budget also included the extension of a $62 million energy tax
which was scheduled to expire. At a time when energy costs are
skyrocketing, allowing this tax to expire would have been welcome
relief for many, but it was extended.

When Republicans offered an alternative budget plan in May, a central
part of the plan was to dedicate over $500 million a year to fund the
Transportation Trust Fund, which pays for the major repairs to our
roadways and bridges. This would have eliminated the need for a gas
tax increase, a toll increase or any of the other costly and
controversial plans suggested by the Governor. Unfortunately, this
budget does nothing to address those needs, leaving an opening for the
Governor to bring his toll road scheme back from the dead.

The debate in Trenton has now changed from ‘Can we cut?’ to ‘Where can
we cut?’. That is a victory for all New Jersey taxpayers. There is
still much work to be done, however. The pension reforms we passed on
Monday were a step in the right direction, but not as strong as we
would have preferred. We still need to fund our transportation needs
without a massive toll or tax hike. We still need to monitor the
waste, fraud and abuse of tax dollars that sadly continues to this
day.

We will continue to be your voice in Trenton and fight for the reforms
which will stop the exodus of people from New Jersey.

Sincerely,

Senator Jennifer Beck

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande

Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon

12th Legislative District

Tom Fitzsimmons
Communications Director
Legislative District 12

Senator Jennifer Beck
Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande
Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon